The Apolliad: Le Chanson de Soleil

The Apolliad is a continuation of The Hesiad series. It marks the end of an era and the beginning of another in the incarnations of the main character of both series. The Apolliad is a series of two books, subtitled Le Chanson de Soleil. The subtitle pays homage to the spirit of the previous series and acknowledges the global nature of the character’s multifaceted lives in its polysemic interpretations.

Le Chanson de Soleil means ‘the song of the sun’ in French. I chose the subtitle after careful consideration and the choice of a French subtitle is for its linguistic, literary and historical attributes rather than for any geographical or particularly French associations. The subtitle pays tribute to other legends chronicled also in rhyme, mostly in French, about a millenia ago, as well as reflects the character’s life which spans several thousand years.

As for the title itself, The Apolliad, it is after Apollo. Apollo is a god of light of antiquity, who is also an incarnation of Horus, and a manifestaion of Zeus and Thor. In The Apolliad, the main character, lays grounds for a long-lasting empire and culminates a journey that spanned several thousand years.

The bookcover is after one of my paintings. The sun and the hawk are one and the same. They are almost one being, or several beings in a state of constant becoming or everlasting unison. The themes of the painting, or the bookcover in this case, flirt with other tales from antiquities of similar motifes albeit of a different nature.

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The Hesiad III: The Herocracies

The last book of The Hesiad triology has been published. The book is the end of a series of books which took years to complete, and the beginning of a new series, with a new theme and a new story.

The Herocracies discusses the incarnations of the main character of the series in order to complete his destined task as foretold by the fortune teller in the ancient scrolls. In many ways the book paves the way for the new series, The Apolliad. The Herocracies marks the end and the beginning, the big crunch, before the big bang of a new golden age.

The new book, The Apolliad: Le Chanson de Soleil builds on the strengths and the achievements of the previous series. The main character goes through an incarnation that achieves a culmination between an ancient past that ceased to exist many years ago, and a volatile present in order to lay an anchor for a golden kingdom that has been sailing for so long.

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The Hesiad (Part I)

This book is a very long journey that started over 20 years ago. Then I had to start it again, then again a few years ago. Eventually I managed to put it together last year from pieces, notes and miscellaneous writings. It was a tough process, but the book or part I of the trilogy is published now.

I still don’t know what all the controversy that surrounded the time before the publication is based on.

From the press release:

‘Rich, powerful and lyrical verse inspired by the mythical origins of the gods of Egypt. The book traces the return of the ancient Egyptian god, Horus, in human form after an ancient battle and how he navigates his way through contemporary life through a series of incarnations. This is the first book in a trilogy.’

Available online at most book stores.

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Three for Three

Today is the first day of Spring and it happens also to be World Poetry Day and Mother’s Day (in Egypt and the US and several other places in the world, in the UK, however it falls on Sunday 26/03). For this triple occasion, I chose three short but potent poems, which are Victorian in the broader sense of the word. The first two poems are Ionic and Anna Dalassini by the renowned Alexandrian Poet, C. P. Cavafy, whose birth and death were in the Springs of 1863 and 1933. The third poem is by Ann Mary Evans (1819-1880), whose pen name is George Eliot. Evans is an internationally-renowned Victorian novelist but she is less known for her poetry. Her poem Roses is such a delightful one and well-fitted for a sunny Spring day like today.

c-p-cavafy

Ionic

That we’ve broken their statues,
that we’ve driven them out of their temples,
doesn’t mean at all that the gods are dead.
O land of Ionia, they’re still in love with you,
their souls still keep your memory.
When an August dawn wakes over you,
your atmosphere is potent with their life,
and sometimes a young ethereal figure,
indistinct, in rapid flight,
wings across your hills.

 

(C.P. Cavafy, Collected Poems. Translated from Modern Greek by Edmund Keeley and Philip Sherrard. Edited by George Savidis. Revised Edition. Princeton University Press, 1992)

 

Anna Dalassini

In the royal decree that Alexios Komninos
put out especially to honor his mother—
the very intelligent Lady Anna Dalassini,
noteworthy in both her works and her manners—
much is said in praise of her.
Here let me offer one phrase only,
a phrase that is beautiful, sublime:
“She never uttered those cold words ‘mine’ or ‘yours.’ ”

(C.P. Cavafy, Collected Poems. Translated from Modern Greek by Edmund Keeley and Philip Sherrard. Edited by George Savidis. Revised Edition. Princeton University Press, 1992)

 

george_eliot_at_30_by_franc3a7ois_d27albert_durade

Roses

You love the roses – so do I. I wish
The sky would rain down roses, as they rain
From off the shaken bush. Why will it not?
Then all the valley would be pink and white
And soft to tread on. They would fall as light
As feathers, smelling sweet; and it would be
Like sleeping and like waking, all at once!

(George Eliot, 1819-1880, The complete poetical works of George Eliot. New York, F.A. Stokes & brother, 1888)