The Hesiad III: The Herocracies

The last book of The Hesiad triology has been published. The book is the end of a series of books which took years to complete, and the beginning of a new series, with a new theme and a new story.

The Herocracies discusses the incarnations of the main character of the series in order to complete his destined task as foretold by the fortune teller in the ancient scrolls. In many ways the book paves the way for the new series, The Apolliad. The Herocracies marks the end and the beginning, the big crunch, before the big bang of a new golden age.

The new book, The Apolliad: Le Chanson de Soleil builds on the strengths and the achievements of the previous series. The main character goes through an incarnation that achieves a culmination between an ancient past that ceased to exist many years ago, and a volatile present in order to lay an anchor for a golden kingdom that has been sailing for so long.

Pegasus

Barnes & Noble

Booktopia

Foyles

Waterstones

Bookus

Amazon UK    –    Amazon US

The Hesiad (Part I)

This book is a very long journey that started over 20 years ago. Then I had to start it again, then again a few years ago. Eventually I managed to put it together last year from pieces, notes and miscellaneous writings. It was a tough process, but the book or part I of the trilogy is published now.

I still don’t know what all the controversy that surrounded the time before the publication is based on.

From the press release:

‘Rich, powerful and lyrical verse inspired by the mythical origins of the gods of Egypt. The book traces the return of the ancient Egyptian god, Horus, in human form after an ancient battle and how he navigates his way through contemporary life through a series of incarnations. This is the first book in a trilogy.’

Available online at most book stores.

Pegasus

Barnes & Noble

Booktopia

Foyles

Waterstones

Bookus

Amazon UK    –  Amazon US

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We’re sorry Isis, we got it wrong…again!

 

The atrocities committed by ISIS are known to the vast majority of people. In the UK we have recently been exposed to yet another terrorist attack which ISIS claimed ‘responsibility’ for. We have seen it on the news, we have read numerous analyses of it in the papers and listened to radio reports on security measures in and around Westminister Palace. Nevertheless, none of ISIS’ atrocities are new to us, their crimes against humanity are well observed by media outlets. Yet not many of us realise that ISIS is a name we made up, that unlike al-Qaeda which is a direct transliteration of the older terrorist organisation’s name, ISIS is something unrelated to this relatively new monstrosity.

Their name is Daesh, which we in the Anglophone world, translated into the ‘Islamic State in Iraq and Syria’ then created the acronym ISIS out of this translation. Some poeple would shrug their shoulders at this and say we call them whatever we call them, it doesn’t matter. But as a matter of fact it matters, because by making up an incorrect name we have also created a confusion between two entirely unrelated entities. Isis is the goddess of fertility and motherhood in ancient Egypt. Her iconography alongside her son Horus has a direct influence on the development of the iconography of Mary and Jesus. ISIS, or Daesh as we should appropriately call it, on the other hand, claim themselves to be Muslim (though many Muslims would disagree with this) and if they could they would destroy all traces of ancient Egyptian heritage as they have done and continue to do with world heritage sites in Iraq and Syria, needless to mention their recent attacks in Egypt.

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Mislabelling anything is misleading enough, but mislabelling evil can lead to bigger horrors by allowing it to disguise itself in forms we revere and cherish.

So once again… We are sorry Isis, goddess and mother of mothers!

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